Wednesday , July 6 2022

Experts have revealed why transfer workers are more likely to have heart attacks



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A study has revealed that employees who make shifts are at a higher risk of heart attack than those who are employed on average 9-5 because of the 24 hour natural clock disruption in our heart cells.

In laboratory experiments with mice, researchers in London have identified the biological processes that make up the circadian rhythm in our heart cells.

The circadian rhythm is a 24-hour cycle that is part of the body’s internal clock and runs in the background to perform vital functions and processes.

Experts report that the risk of fatal cardiovascular disease increases when the circadian rhythm is disrupted and the heart cells do not ‘sync’ with the brain due to intermittent shifts.

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Different systems of the body, such as our circulatory system, follow cyclical rhythms that are synchronized with the main clock of the brain.  Daily heart rate changes are regulated by 'heart clocks'

Various systems in the body, such as our circulatory system, follow cyclical rhythms that are synchronized with the main clock in the brain. Daily heart rate changes are regulated by ‘heart clocks’

Scientists have shown that heart cells regulate their cyclical rhythms through daily changes in sodium and potassium ion levels.

Sirikadian Rhythms

The circadian rhythm is a 24-hour cycle that is part of the body’s internal clock and runs in the background to perform vital functions and processes.

One of the most important and well-known circadian rhythms is the sleep-wake cycle.

Different systems of the body follow a circadian rhythm that is synchronized with the main clock in the brain.

This key clock is directly affected by environmental signals, especially light, which is why circadian rhythms are associated with the day and night cycle.

When properly aligned, a circadian rhythm can promote a steady and restorative sleep.

But when this circadian rhythm goes away, it can cause significant sleep problems, including insomnia.

Research shows that circadian rhythms play an important role in various aspects of physical and mental health.

Source: Sleep Foundation

Different levels of sodium and potassium ions inside and outside the heart cells are important because they allow the electrical impulse that drives the heart to contract.

It is a well-known fact that shifting workers who are accustomed to working unpaid hours during the week are at higher risk of heart attack. A new study shows that this is due to these disruptions at the cellular biological level.

Dr. John O’Neill, lead author of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in London, says that ‘the way the heart works around the clock is more complex than previously thought’.

The ion series, which contributes to the increase in heart rate, changes according to the daily cycle.

‘Normally when we are asleep, this helps the heart to cope with changes in activity and increased demands during the day when the heart rate is higher than at night.’

Dr. O’Neill believes that this new understanding could lead to better therapeutic and preventative measures to combat heart disease.

For example, it opens up the fascinating potential for more effective treatment for cardiovascular disease, for example by administering drugs at the right time of day.

The circadian rhythm in mammals is a natural and internal process that regulates the sleep-wake cycle independently of light and darkness and explain why we get jet lag.

Our circadian rhythm is regulated when we feel sleepy and when we are most alert during a 24 hour cycle.

Different systems of the body follow a circadian rhythm that is synchronized with the master clock in the brain.

This main clock is directly affected by environmental signals, especially light, and therefore circadian rhythms are linked to the day and night cycle.

It is already known that shifting employees who work unpaid hours during the week are at higher risk of heart attack (stock image of a shift worker)

It is already known that shifting employees who work long hours during the week are at higher risk of heart attack (stock image of a shift worker).

However, studies have shown that lifestyles that are contrary to our natural internal clock — such as night shifts — can cause internal circadian rhythms in heart cells to lose their ‘connection’ with our behavior.

When the heart cells interfere with the circadian rhythm and the body is unable to cope with the main clock in the brain, the risk of heart attack increases.

Dr. O’Neill said most life-threatening heart problems occur at certain times of the day and often occur during shifts.

We think that when the circadian clock in the heart is not synchronized with those in the brain, as in working shifts, our cardiovascular system may be less able to cope with the stress of working in everyday life.

‘This increases the risk of heart failure.’

The worst kind of switching process in this regard is working through the night when there is no sunlight, however, any kind of shifting work that does not fit throughout the week can disrupt the cardiac rhythms.

The problem arises because when you go from day shift to night shift (or vice versa) you make demands on your body contrary to its natural cyclic rhythm.

The circadian rhythm adjusts to a new routine (like jet lag), which can take days, during which time our health may be most at risk.

Previously, it was believed that cellular ion concentrations remained constant in heart tissue.

In experiments with mice, the researchers found that heart cells change their internal sodium and potassium levels day and night in anticipation of daily demands.

The video shows potassium (K), chlorine (Club) and sodium (Na) ions going in and out of the heart cells and showing corresponding changes in the concentration of certain proteins in the cells.

When we wake up, there are more sodium and potassium ions in the heart cells than at night.

These changes in sodium and potassium ions take place in order to give the cell more of the protein needed for our metabolism and other daily activities.

Ions are actually pumped in to ‘allow’ protein to increase daily.

Alessandra Stangerlin, lead author of the study, was surprised to find that sodium and potassium levels in isolated cells and heart tissue change by up to 30 percent.

This results in a significant daily doubling of the electrical activity of isolated heart cells.

The study was conducted using laboratory cells and mice, and its findings are supported by a coordinated study recently conducted by collaborators led by Professor David Bechtold of the University of Manchester.

Their study showed that circadian rhythms in heart rate and electrical activity are evident in both mice and humans, and that sudden changes in behavior or sleep patterns can interfere with this normal heart rhythm.

The new study is published in the journal Nature Communications.

What do you need to know about cardiovascular disease?

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a common term for conditions that affect the heart or blood vessels.

It is usually associated with increased fatty deposits (narrowing of the arteries) and increased risk of blood clots.

Damage to the arteries of organs such as the brain, heart, kidneys and eyes can also be involved.

CVD is a leading cause of death and disability in the UK, but it can often be prevented by living a healthy lifestyle.

All heart disease is cardiovascular disease but not all cardiovascular disease is cardiovascular disease.

CVD events include heart disease and stroke.

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death globally, with an estimated 17.9 million deaths each year.

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